At this very moment, I'm thinking I should launder our bedsheets.

Why is it that, when a woman stops doing the housekeeping and starts focusing on other interests, advice columnists suggest she has depression?

Is it not possible that after more than 10 years of picking up the messes, doing the laundry, cooking all the meals, and generally running things, that she may have decided the payoff wasn’t worth the effort?

It is possible that one might choose to live in less than pristine conditions just for the sake of more free personal time. If a man is a bachelor and lives in squalor, it’s chalked up to not knowing how to do housekeeping... but that’s okay because he’s a man.

I just read a column where a man bitched about coming home from work and having to do all the housekeeping and cooking after a long day. Boo. Hoo. I can’t say I feel for you. Perhaps during the first decade of marriage your wife did all the stuff while holding down a full time job. Once she had her second child, she came to the full realization you’ve been having a free ride. So she’s decided the tables should turn.

Sure she went to working one day a week, gained weight, and let the housekeeping go. She hadn’t changed the bed sheets for 4 months? Maybe it's because she's too busy changing diapers and figures you can take care of your own sweet ass. In four months' time you couldn't get off your own butt to do a freakin' load of laundry?

It sounds to me that this woman has decided to see how the other half lives. It can be quite a liberating experience. In a cohabiting relationship, it takes two people to determine the median state of cleanliness. And one person's tidy is another person's squalor.


kat@adchick.com

on the day this was written: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8690-2005Apr22.html

on the day this was posted: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/02/AR2005120201573.html